TMG’s top 5 travel boots!

Travelling can be hard on your feet, especially considering the activities some tourists are interested in. Travelling Mystery Guest has done some online window shopping and we have chosen our top 5 favourite and fashionable boots for men and women! They are available from Poetry, Old Khaki, Cape Union Mart, Due South and Outdoor Warehouse.

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  1. Women

Caitlyn boots

Caitlyn Boots , Poetry R1499

Rare earth dana boots

Rare earth Dana Boots , Poetry R1399

Rare earth kath boot

Rare earth Kath Boots , Poetry R999

Caterpillar irenea boot

Caterpillar Irenea Boots ,  Poetry R1499

Caterpillar Lillian leather boot

Caterpillar Lillian Leather Ankle Boot , Due South R1999

2. Men

Caterpillar oatman boots

Caterpillar Oatman Boots , Cape Union Mart R1499

Caterpillar grayson

Caterpillar Grayson Boots , Outdoor Warehouse R1850

Arthur jack corbin boots

Arthur Jack Corbin Shoe , Cape Union Mart R1399

Arthur jack ronan boots

Arthur Jack Ronan Boots , Old Khaki R1399

Hi tech Men's altitude V Waterproof boot

Hi-tec Men’s Altitude V Waterproof Boots , Outdoor Warehouse R1895

Written by: Alicia Redelinghuys 

Different types of Tourists

In the hospitality industry, you will be introduced to a lot of different people. As tourists, they become your customers. Certain businesses cater for certain types of tourists. Travelling Mystery Guest helps you to identity the different tourist types, which assists you in understanding the requirements.

  1. Incentive tourists:

This group includes people who didn’t initially plan on visiting your destination For example, a worker has accomplished his sales target and he is rewarded with a dinner for two. Since they had no intention of coming to you, they won’t particularly have a set expectation. This is a good opportunity to wow a customer. These people view this rewards as inspiration to work harder, and therefore it could be a good idea to build customer loyalty by adding a personal sentiment to their experience. Example: a bottle of wine with a personalized congratulations message.

  1. Business tourists:

These people travel purely for business reasons. If you manage an accommodation service and you want to lure business travelers, providing them with conference rooms is probably the best way. Bring their work place to where they are staying rather than being dependent on meeting facilities near you to bring in customers. When you have facilities available, offer them everything they may need. Water and juice in the room, lunch at a specific time and any other service they might require. These people are not specifically there to enjoy luxury but they don’t want to struggle while they are busy working. Try and provide as much as possible, especially transport and internet services.

  1. Leisure tourists:

This group is on holiday purely for relaxation and luxury. When accommodating some of these travelers, it would be a golden opportunity to up sell all the services your business provides. If you don’t have a spa or relaxation facilities, be sure to equip these visitors with enough information of where they can find them. Don’t fuss around these customers, but be sure to provide them with everything they might need. It would be good to offer them something extra, for example, drinks served by the pool.

  1. Sport or recreation tourist:

These tourists either take part in sports or they are there to watch sports. When you are aware of a sports event near you and the customers have informed you that they will be attending, it could be a good opportunity to provide some extra services. They might be returning at a late hour or leaving early in the morning. Ask them if they have any special preferences, for example food at a certain time. Also try to take part in their experience by wishing them luck or saying you hope they enjoy the event.

  1. Special Interest Tourist

This group is visiting because of a certain passion. It will be good to stay informed about events near your destination and interests in your location. For example, people who are staying at your lodge during a bird watching trip. This tourist type often plans their travelling very well, so you might be informed about their activities before they arrive. Always accommodate their arrival time and the reason they are visiting. As with sport tourists, you can take part in their trip by asking about their experience.

Written by: Alicia Redelinghuys 

Resources:

The different types of tourists in tourism industry, online, accessed 10/02/2017, also available at www.hotelresortinsider.com

 

Staycations – A threat or an opportunity for your destination?

Written by: Renate Engelbrecht

There is a lot being written about the word, Staycation, but do we really get what it’s about? Do we realise that Staycations could either be seen as a threat or an opportunity for local businesses?

Staycation

Staycation – Photo taken by Renate Engelbrecht

We often tend to focus all our marketing efforts on guests coming in from abroad – you know, those with the dollars. But then, when last have we really taken a good look at what the customers right under our noses, the locals, are looking for? That family of four driving past your destination every day on their way to school; the couple who just bought a new home around the corner and committed themselves to weekly date nights; the retirees who love to invite their precious grandchildren for a visit, but don’t know where to take them for entertainment…

STAYCATION: A period in which individuals or families stay at home and take part in local leisure activities within driving distance from their homes and sleep in their own beds at night.

What causes guests to revert to Staycations?

  • Economic pressure or recession
  • The rise of fuel prices
  • The increase of tourists who want to reduce the carbon footprint
  • The urge and necessity to save time (travelling could take up to two days, where Staycations require one hour’s travel at most)
  • The larger the family, the less the finances for travel when you take into account the costs of restaurants, transport and accommodation
  • Health concerns may alter travelling plans
  • Work commitments may thwart plans of travelling abroad or even just out of town

How can Staycations be to your destination’s advantage?

  • You can get the locals on your side – the best all year round customers you could wish for!
  • Local businesses can work together, for once, and build a stronger, more steadfast relationship
  • You could wind up with a whole new group of customers, allowing you to broaden customer experiences offered, hence catering for a wider range of clients.
  • It will drive you to get involved in your local community – a must in today’s competitive business environment and economy.
  • It will encourage you to learn more about your immediate and surrounding areas – something we tend to neglect when focusing on foreign tourists.

How can you drive locals, or rather, Staycationers, to your destination?

It so happens that not all towns and cities are ideal for Staycations. This is where you, as a destination, have the obligation to create experiences for Staycationers and keep them from driving to the nearest best town for the day. Yes, you still want to make a buck or two, which is why you need to think clever! You need to find a way to cater for guests who want to relax in a wallet-friendly environment, while still growing your profits:

  • Open your destination’s swimming pool for the public on certain days, offering refreshments and snacks on a budget that might up your sales for the day. Add some water activities, i.e. water aerobics at an hourly fee and increase profits in that way.
  • Put up some alternative activities that may be used by the public at a minimal fee. Think table tennis, volleyball, giant chess, put-put and some facilitated local games like the well-known South African Boeresport. That’ll keep’em busy!
  • Run local tours – not only at your destination, but also in the surrounding areas. Make it interesting and try to educate. Educational tourism is just as much a thing as Staycations. Put together an “Explore your city” package with local businesses like museums, botanical gardens and local breweries, for example, and put a mark-up on it.
  • Host a fun run and have participants enjoy a breakfast buffet at your on-site restaurant afterwards at a discounted rate. Often you will find, if it was a good experience, that these guests stay for longer or they return.

I say, let’s turn Staycations into the best opportunity for destinations yet!

15 Hospitality Tips for 2015

So, we’ve given you our thoughts and observations from 2014 and today we’d like to share some of our hospitality tips for 2015 with you:

 
1. According to a report by Deloitte, China and India will continue to be the key hospitality markets to cater for in 2015.
2. Understand your “customer’s journey” very well. This will assist you to know what customers need or want.
3. Get to know your customers in order for you to be able to serve them what they want the next time around. If you have a guest who comes down to the bar every evening and orders a Coke, tomorrow you will be able to take out the Coke and serve it to him as he sits down. He wouldn’t even have to ask for it.
4. Couple your service with an experience. Most customers, these days, like to have an experience wherever they go. Even a small trick with a napkin might have them in awe.
5. See what you can do to couple your service with cycling this year. This sport has increased tremendously, allowing for some great tourism and marketing opportunities.
6. Peer2Peer dining is an interesting trend that has emerged overseas which might not be a bad idea if implemented correctly.
7. You’ve got to be mobile. With wearable technological devices increasing, there is no turning back on this anymore. Hotel groups like Marriot, Hyatt and Hilton are currently working with companies like Checkmate to develop this mobile service even further, which means mobile is now a necessity in the hospitality industry.
8. According to a poll done for the Hotels.com mobile app, tourists upload holiday photos within ten minutes of arriving at a destination. Ignite Hospitality refers to them as “Braggies” and let’s face it, the “selfie” is here to stay. Keep in mind that people will be taking selfies at your destination too and they would want to link and share it with you. Be sure to be on social media!
9. Social Wi-Fi will be a trend in 2015, moving away from the original Wi-Fi login process, customers will now rather be encouraged to log onto destinations’ Wi-Fi through their social networks, allowing the destination to gain more access to the customer to build a better and stronger database.
10. Social reviews (Facebook, TripAdvisor, etc.) will only be increasing in 2015. Be sure that you have processes in place regarding responses to bad comments, maximizing good reviews, etc.
11. Stay active on social networks. Being on social networks is good, but you’ve got to interact and show customers that you are available on a daily basis.
12. Create your own mobile apps, allowing guests to order before they arrive. People tend to be impatient – ordering before they arrive will prevent them from waiting for their food, but it will also protect you from them changing their minds and going elsewhere when they arrive.
13. Food trends predicted for 2015 include reduced sugar and protein boosters. Customers want a “well-being feeling” and we need to cater for that.
14. Customers are experimenting with many local breweries and prefer beers and wines from micro-breweries and smaller boutique wineries. Guests would rather drink a beer that is promoted with the line: “We recommend this local beer, produced at a brewery just down the road.”
15. Sustainability is one of the big trends, whether we like it or not. Many customers prefer supporting establishments that make an effort to make their business more environmentally friendly. Consider looking at a few ways in which you can incorporate environmental and social responsibility in your business.

Workshop & Discussion: Get to know your customers

There is a reason why destinations often struggle to provide the best possible customer service to their guests and it’s because we don’t always know our customers.

Today’s customers are much more informed than a few years ago. We would like to take a look at a few topics which will assist destinations in getting to know their customers better.

Here are the topics we’d like to discuss:

  • Types of tourists
  • Types of customers
  • Being a tourist and a customer
  • What tourists and customers expect
  • The customer journey affects a customer personally
  • Teach employees to know customers better
  • How to collect customers’ data without disturbing them

Would you be interested in joining us for this workshop? Let us know!

Contact us on 082 336 1562 / enquire@travellingmystery.co.za

Storytelling for hotels and guesthouses – Part Two

Nowadays, with people being on the move, telling your story with words might be quite challenging, as people don’t have time to read. How can you tell your story, capture their attention and have them understand what you are all about?

Sharing Content

Sharing Content (Photo by: Marda de Villiers)

  • Tell your story visually – people like looking at and sharing images. Use platforms like Pinterest, Instagram, Youtube and Facebook, as well as photo blogs. With the typical guest using a dozen different touch points to research their trips, you want your story to be visible on as many platforms as possible.
  • Combine your hotel’s story with an educational tour around the resort or establishment or an art class that interconnects with your story (tourists prefer interactive and educational experiences these days).
  • Have your audience take part in your story and take photos of their experiences which you can share with them through social media.
  • Tell one part of the story today and the other part tomorrow.
  • Write only a part of the story and ask the audience to partake in a competition to complete the final chapters or to add the visual content to the story.

Why tell your story?

Because “nothing holds attention like a great story”. (MSGroup – Creative Storytellers). According to research the human brain still searches for a story to make sense of information. Stories are universal and therefore they cross the boundaries of language, culture, gender and age. They are told and retold and build a sense of community which in event establishes emotional connections and creates a shared sense of purpose.

By telling your story, you will be able to create emotional connections with your guests which would never have been possible otherwise.

Learn more about storytelling, content creation and social media sharing at Travelling Mystery Guest’s workshops. Contact Renate for more information on 082 336 1562 / enquire@travellingmystery.co.za.

Go ahead – write your story and share it with the world!

CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM – Inevitable in the travel sector

29 January 2014. Johannesburg. Constructive criticism tends to leave a bitter taste in your mouth when the words are spoken. Still, it is one of the things I believe to have been omitted from many parts in the travel industry that has to be brought back in order to ensure quality customer service.

Customers have become educated in more than one way and not knowing about certain problem areas within a tourism or hospitality organization might just be your downfall. In fact, customers are so well educated on such an array of subjects that some have become masters in constructive feedback. Think about it: most people, including you, wouldn’t hesitate to call a waiter back if the coffee is cold or the steak is not prepared to perfection. Especially when a substantial amount of money is being spent.

Constructive Criticism

Constructive Criticism

Like any person, hearing (and accepting) that you’ve done something wrong is one of the hardest things to hear.  Many people immediately react aggressively or impatiently. Others don’t know how to react and decide to ignore the situation (which is, by the way, one of the worst things you could do).

Why have we not been able to teach our employees to handle constructive criticism? Why can’t we handle constructive criticism ourselves? Why are we afraid of hearing things that might in fact assist us in becoming market leaders?

I believe the reason is quite simple:

We’ve come to think that we’re invincible. South Africa is such a beautiful country, that we sometimes feel we can just sit back and let the sunny South do its own marketing and PR with it winning nature’s lottery and all. Unfortunately, domestic and international customers notice our lack of attention to their expectations and with such a wide variety of establishments to choose from, tourists now choose the ones that take their needs to heart. It’s not just about a pleasant holiday anymore. It’s about building relationships with people and places to which you can one day return again. It’s about trust. People are willing to pay more for quality customer service. Fast service is good, but quality service is excellent. Customers don’t remember days; they remember moments.

We need to start listening to our customers and friends from the industry – that is the only way we will be able to identify loopholes in the customer’s journey on which we can act.

Travelling Mystery Guest assists establishments with creating their customer journey map, visits establishments in a customer’s capacity and provides customized, comprehensive and constructive feedback and suggestions on aspects that need attention with regards to the customer’s experience. The company also offers regular workshops on customer service, customer behavior, storytelling and social media and presents these workshops at your establishment.

Workshops for February and March include the following topics:

–          And THAT’s why the customer is in charge

–          Exceeding your customer’s expectations without too much effort

–          Content Creation and Sharing

–          Facebook marketing

–          Twitter marketing

–          LinkedIn and Google+ marketing

For bookings and more information, contact Renate de Villiers on enquire@travellingmystery.co.za or 079 110 5674. Workshop topics and content information will also be readily available here on the TMG blog.