Different types of Tourists

In the hospitality industry, you will be introduced to a lot of different people. As tourists, they become your customers. Certain businesses cater for certain types of tourists. Travelling Mystery Guest helps you to identity the different tourist types, which assists you in understanding the requirements.

  1. Incentive tourists:

This group includes people who didn’t initially plan on visiting your destination For example, a worker has accomplished his sales target and he is rewarded with a dinner for two. Since they had no intention of coming to you, they won’t particularly have a set expectation. This is a good opportunity to wow a customer. These people view this rewards as inspiration to work harder, and therefore it could be a good idea to build customer loyalty by adding a personal sentiment to their experience. Example: a bottle of wine with a personalized congratulations message.

  1. Business tourists:

These people travel purely for business reasons. If you manage an accommodation service and you want to lure business travelers, providing them with conference rooms is probably the best way. Bring their work place to where they are staying rather than being dependent on meeting facilities near you to bring in customers. When you have facilities available, offer them everything they may need. Water and juice in the room, lunch at a specific time and any other service they might require. These people are not specifically there to enjoy luxury but they don’t want to struggle while they are busy working. Try and provide as much as possible, especially transport and internet services.

  1. Leisure tourists:

This group is on holiday purely for relaxation and luxury. When accommodating some of these travelers, it would be a golden opportunity to up sell all the services your business provides. If you don’t have a spa or relaxation facilities, be sure to equip these visitors with enough information of where they can find them. Don’t fuss around these customers, but be sure to provide them with everything they might need. It would be good to offer them something extra, for example, drinks served by the pool.

  1. Sport or recreation tourist:

These tourists either take part in sports or they are there to watch sports. When you are aware of a sports event near you and the customers have informed you that they will be attending, it could be a good opportunity to provide some extra services. They might be returning at a late hour or leaving early in the morning. Ask them if they have any special preferences, for example food at a certain time. Also try to take part in their experience by wishing them luck or saying you hope they enjoy the event.

  1. Special Interest Tourist

This group is visiting because of a certain passion. It will be good to stay informed about events near your destination and interests in your location. For example, people who are staying at your lodge during a bird watching trip. This tourist type often plans their travelling very well, so you might be informed about their activities before they arrive. Always accommodate their arrival time and the reason they are visiting. As with sport tourists, you can take part in their trip by asking about their experience.

Written by: Alicia Redelinghuys 

Resources:

The different types of tourists in tourism industry, online, accessed 10/02/2017, also available at www.hotelresortinsider.com

 

Learn from 2016’s mistakes

As the year draws to a close, it is time that we take a step back and reflect on not only our achievements, but also our failures. Like Harold J. Smith once said:

“More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren’t so busy denying them.”

The Pepper Tree Restaurant

The Pepper Tree Restaurant

The reason for our reflection is not to carry our mistakes with us, but rather to use them as stepping stones towards achieving bigger heights in  2017. Therefore, we’ve made a list of the general shortcomings in South Africa’s hospitality industry, hoping that it might be a guide to improvement in the year to come:

Restaurants:

  • Communication is one of the most basic, yet most neglected service standards when it comes to South African restaurants. I’m not talking about “hello” and “goodbye”; I’m talking about keeping your guests informed, looking them in the eye and serving with confidence. Communication is not just a language. It’s a way of doing. It’s not only verbal, but also non-verbal. Your body language often says more than your words.
  • Up-selling is non-existent in most South African restaurants. Managers may argue and say that they don’t want to bombard guests with too much information and they don’t want waiters faffing around the guests all the time. I say your waiters are not your only up-selling tool. Yes, they are a great up-selling tool and with the right technique and confidence, they could probably increase your sales with at least 10% per seating just by convincing guests to order an additional item on the menu. But, there are other methods too. Need some tips? Let us help you to work out an up-selling technique for your restaurant with our workshop on up-selling professionally. Contact us for more information on 082 336 1562 / enquire@travellingmystery.co.za

Accommodation establishments:

  • In 3 to 4-star establishments, the customer service levels are often not up to standard in most of the departments. From receptionists that are not available at the reception desk, to porters who don’t show, to room service timing and delivery, to the cleanliness of the in-house gym, to the availability of amenities. Systems and standard operating procedures need to be put in place and need to be adhered to at all times to ensure that the customer journey runs smoothly.
  • Maintenance is a touchy subject, yet so very important. A preventative maintenance plan needs to be in place and needs to be kept up to date at all times. Once an establishment has let this slip for 6 months or more, the maintenance costs escalate at a very fast pace, which means other business aspects will need to be neglected in order to fix this.
  • Health and safety is almost never the fun part of running an accommodation establishment, but it is crucial. Even though fire extinguisher and emergency exit signs are not necessarily aesthetically appealing, it is important to put them up. The problem comes in where establishments put them up in places where they are not really visible to the guests, which completely defeats the purpose. Guests need to be able to see these signs in case of an emergency.
  • Following up does not happen very often. It often seems as if there is a general agreement that when a guest has checked out, all is well with the world. Still, following up with guests, asking about their stay, inviting them to come again, is the actual final part of the guest’s visit. Not the departure. This forms part of the post-stay phase in the customer’s journey, hence, it is just as important as the pre-stay and the visit. Following up makes a guest feel cared for and will make them want to return (if the stay was pleasant). Don’t neglect the post-stay phase of the customer journey. It’s like up-selling for the guest’s next trip.

These are only a few of the things we’ve noticed in 2016. Use it, don’t use it. Just remember:

“A mistake repeated more than once, is a decision.” -Paulo Coelho

Upselling: A useful tool in the hospitality industry

Upselling, also known as suggestive selling, is an ideal tool in the hospitality industry, as it not only gives staff the opportunity to create larger sales, but it can also be used to create greater customer satisfaction.

 
Yes, many times, the word “upselling” can leave a bitter taste in your mouth due to sales people nagging and nagging you to buy certain products. I believe that those sales people just haven’t had the right training – especially when it comes to the hospitality and tourism industry. In our industry, it’s all about the customer experience and customers definitely don’t want to be bombarded with sales pitches. Still, they do expect staff to tell them a little more about services offered, the current specials or things that they might be interested in.

 
Upselling, when used correctly, gives you the opportunity to get closer to your customer. To get to know them better.

 
Interestingly enough, we tend to use the word upselling incorrectly sometimes. Let me explain:

 
If a guest buys a room for R1200 per night and the reservationist offers the guest a better room with a view and an en suite bathroom at R1500 per night, that’s upselling. Cross-selling, on the other hand, is when you sell products that are different, but related, to the product that has already been bought. An example: If I buy a room at R1200 per night, the reservationist offers me the option of adding a spa treatment at the spa next door at R600. With upselling, the price of the product being bought is increased. With cross-selling extra items are added to the original product to increase the sale.

 
Keep in mind that it’s not a race, but rather a route to follow to help the customer get more value from your business, eventually creating more loyal customers who are sure to return time and again.

 
Groovehq.com mentions a few reasons why upselling and cross-selling are so positive:
1. When done right, it builds deeper relationships with customers.
2. It’s easier than selling to new customers and helps you grow.
3. Upselling increases customer lifetime value.

 
Teach your employees how to use upselling and cross-selling effectively by attending Travelling Mystery Guest’s upcoming workshop on this topic on 4 July 2015 (combined with 3 July 2015 workshop on communication) or 8 July 2015. For more information, contact Renate on 082 336 1562 or enquire@travellingmystery.co.za.

Notes on SA’s restaurant industry

The hospitality industry is not an easy industry to be in. It’s long hours, often unthankful customers and not necessarily great pay. Still, many people are in the industry for the love of serving others, being hospitable and enjoying the opportunity of meeting new people every day. The industry can get you down sometimes, though, and I believe that this is one of the main reasons customers don’t always get the service they expect. I’ve made a list of the main things I have noticed are not being done professionally in many South African restaurants:

 
Up-selling
Staff are often uncertain about menu items and specials and do not have the confidence to up-sell the restaurant’s services to its customers. Train employees to know the business and to believe in it and they will sell it to your customers.

 
Communication
It’s often the case that guests are not kept in the loop of things while waiting for their order at a restaurant. Remind employees to keep their customers informed regarding waiting times and current specials.

 
Personal Neatness
There is a certain standard in the hospitality industry regarding personal hygiene and personal neatness. Make sure that your staff know what this standard is and that it should be adhered to at all times.

 
Pulling out the chair
It doesn’t happen very often that a waiter pulls out a chair for a lady, but if it happens, it makes her feel special and welcome. Remind staff to make guests feel welcome with small, professional gestures like this.

 

Have a great Easter and keep striving towards customer service excellence!

What do you expect from the hospitality industry?

Feel free to let us know what you expect from the hospitality industry and we’ll be sure to include this in our upcoming workshops for the industry:

Challenges in the hospitality industry

Any industry has its ups and downs and so the hospitality industry in South Africa also has certain challenges to face.

Hospitality Solutions

Hospitality Solutions

Travelling Mystery Guest has been observing a few challenges which need to be addressed – let us know if you agree and what your thoughts are:

  • Economy: South Africa’s economy has taken a knock and local business has decreased tremendously. But, this gives us the opportunity to look at other possibilities like targeting international tourists. Have you given that any thought yet?
  • Working hours: The hospitality industry has always been known as one of the industries with long and irregular working hours. Have you ever given thought as to how we can change this or work around it? I know of one restaurant that has decided to reduce is operating hours to ensure that its staff get enough personal time. This ensures that they have more energy and loyalty to the company, allowing for great customer service. Yes, it’s less time to make money, but trust me, with such loyalty from staff you can move mountains!
  • Shift work: Staff working different shifts makes it difficult to arrange staff meetings, etcetera. How do you work around this?
  • Transport for staff: Most staff working in South Africa’s hospitality sector use public transport. Do you as a hotel, guesthouse or restaurant provide staff with additional options like on-site accommodation, transport allowances or in-house transport options?
  • In-house training: Many of the smaller hospitality establishments and even some of the larger companies neglect to pay attention to training their staff on a regular basis. Training not only forms part of basic customer service, it also provides staff with the feeling of belonging and self actualization. If you, as a manager, can’t find the time to train staff, get someone to do it for you. Travelling Mystery Guest offers customized workshops and presents the workshops at your establishment. No effort, no need to organize additional staff, no need to plan transport – we come to you.
  • Bad customer service: Is this due to the lack of training or is it just attitude? Either way – something’s got to be done. If it’s a lack of training, make a plan and train your staff. Lack of attitude – if you hired them, you have the right to fire them. Make this clear and don’t just say it – act on it.
  • The lack of loyalty: I’ve noticed that many people are not in the hospitality industry for the love of it, but merely because that’s the only job they could get. We need to find a way to make our staff love the industry. We will never be able to exceed customers’ expectations if our staff don’t have the right attitude. Management needs to find a way to make staff love what they do. Get to know your staff, place them in the right departments, train them on things they are interested in and build on their strengths rather than focusing on what they can’t do right.

Do you have any comments or ideas? Would you like to add other challenges to the above? Feel free to comment below.

Travelling Mystery Guest is planning a brainstorming session on the challenges in South Africa’s hospitality industry and solutions to consider for the end of May. Let us know if you would be interested in attending, and we’ll add you to our contact list for further details. Contact Renate on 082 336 1562 or enquire@travellingmystery.co.za. Follow the hashtag #HospitalitySolutionsSA and let’s encourage South Africa to overcome the challenges we face in the hospitality industry.

Special Package for the Hospitality Industry

Special Package for the Hospitality Industry

P.S. It is recommended that this package is used for a minimum of 3 months in order to see results.

Book your customer journey evaluation (including customized measurements) today! Contact Renate on 082 336 1562 or enquire@travellingmystery.co.za.