Reception Checklist:

The reception area (with the exception of the security gate) of any hotel or guesthouse is the very first impression as part of the customer’s journey guests experience at your venue. With that in mind, we’ve put together a checklist of things you might have to keep in mind for your guests’ arrival:

Hotel Lincoln (Photographer: Jenna Leigh Kutcher)

Hotel Lincoln (Photographer: Jenna Leigh Kutcher)

1. Smiles and friendliness
2. A welcoming body language
3. Porters, offering assistance with luggage from the parking area.
4. Luggage trolleys (optional, but ideal for larger venues)
5. Neat, professional appearance of all staff members.
6. Name badges for all staff members.
7. Additional seating for when guests need to wait a while.
8. Welcome drinks and snacks (optional, but always impressive)
9. Fact sheets of the venue
10. Additional information about the surrounding area and things to do
11. Maps of the facilities, if it is a large hotel complex
12. Branded confirmation letters, writing pads, pens, envelopes, etc.
13. Booking options for on-site spas, restaurants, golf courses, etc.
14. Key cards / keys for rooms
15. Key card holders (branded)
16. Luggage storage facility
17. Luggage storage tags (branded)
18. A general safe for guests’ larger personal items.
19. Safety deposit procedures in place.
20. Rate your stay / rate your dining experience cards
21. Dental kits
22. Sewing kits
23. Sanitary kits
24. Shoe mitts
25. Additional shower gel, shampoo and body lotion
26. Additional wrapped soaps
27. Additional shower caps
28. Cell phone chargers for all the different cell phones
29. Two point plugs and universal plugs
30. Matches
31. Candles (if there is no generator, which should be seen as a necessity in South Africa these days…)

 
Can you think of anything else? Perhaps you’ve stayed at a hotel that had some additional items that impressed? Let us know by commenting below.

 

Sources: The EveryGirl

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Upselling: A useful tool in the hospitality industry

Upselling, also known as suggestive selling, is an ideal tool in the hospitality industry, as it not only gives staff the opportunity to create larger sales, but it can also be used to create greater customer satisfaction.

 
Yes, many times, the word “upselling” can leave a bitter taste in your mouth due to sales people nagging and nagging you to buy certain products. I believe that those sales people just haven’t had the right training – especially when it comes to the hospitality and tourism industry. In our industry, it’s all about the customer experience and customers definitely don’t want to be bombarded with sales pitches. Still, they do expect staff to tell them a little more about services offered, the current specials or things that they might be interested in.

 
Upselling, when used correctly, gives you the opportunity to get closer to your customer. To get to know them better.

 
Interestingly enough, we tend to use the word upselling incorrectly sometimes. Let me explain:

 
If a guest buys a room for R1200 per night and the reservationist offers the guest a better room with a view and an en suite bathroom at R1500 per night, that’s upselling. Cross-selling, on the other hand, is when you sell products that are different, but related, to the product that has already been bought. An example: If I buy a room at R1200 per night, the reservationist offers me the option of adding a spa treatment at the spa next door at R600. With upselling, the price of the product being bought is increased. With cross-selling extra items are added to the original product to increase the sale.

 
Keep in mind that it’s not a race, but rather a route to follow to help the customer get more value from your business, eventually creating more loyal customers who are sure to return time and again.

 
Groovehq.com mentions a few reasons why upselling and cross-selling are so positive:
1. When done right, it builds deeper relationships with customers.
2. It’s easier than selling to new customers and helps you grow.
3. Upselling increases customer lifetime value.

 
Teach your employees how to use upselling and cross-selling effectively by attending Travelling Mystery Guest’s upcoming workshop on this topic on 4 July 2015 (combined with 3 July 2015 workshop on communication) or 8 July 2015. For more information, contact Renate on 082 336 1562 or enquire@travellingmystery.co.za.

Notes on SA’s restaurant industry

The hospitality industry is not an easy industry to be in. It’s long hours, often unthankful customers and not necessarily great pay. Still, many people are in the industry for the love of serving others, being hospitable and enjoying the opportunity of meeting new people every day. The industry can get you down sometimes, though, and I believe that this is one of the main reasons customers don’t always get the service they expect. I’ve made a list of the main things I have noticed are not being done professionally in many South African restaurants:

 
Up-selling
Staff are often uncertain about menu items and specials and do not have the confidence to up-sell the restaurant’s services to its customers. Train employees to know the business and to believe in it and they will sell it to your customers.

 
Communication
It’s often the case that guests are not kept in the loop of things while waiting for their order at a restaurant. Remind employees to keep their customers informed regarding waiting times and current specials.

 
Personal Neatness
There is a certain standard in the hospitality industry regarding personal hygiene and personal neatness. Make sure that your staff know what this standard is and that it should be adhered to at all times.

 
Pulling out the chair
It doesn’t happen very often that a waiter pulls out a chair for a lady, but if it happens, it makes her feel special and welcome. Remind staff to make guests feel welcome with small, professional gestures like this.

 

Have a great Easter and keep striving towards customer service excellence!

Treat your guests for Valentine’s

It is true that everybody just wants to be loved.

Why not share the love with your guests with these few ideas on Valentine’s Day:

Conversation Heart Cookies

Conversation Heart Cookies (Graham Cracker)

15 Hospitality Tips for 2015

So, we’ve given you our thoughts and observations from 2014 and today we’d like to share some of our hospitality tips for 2015 with you:

 
1. According to a report by Deloitte, China and India will continue to be the key hospitality markets to cater for in 2015.
2. Understand your “customer’s journey” very well. This will assist you to know what customers need or want.
3. Get to know your customers in order for you to be able to serve them what they want the next time around. If you have a guest who comes down to the bar every evening and orders a Coke, tomorrow you will be able to take out the Coke and serve it to him as he sits down. He wouldn’t even have to ask for it.
4. Couple your service with an experience. Most customers, these days, like to have an experience wherever they go. Even a small trick with a napkin might have them in awe.
5. See what you can do to couple your service with cycling this year. This sport has increased tremendously, allowing for some great tourism and marketing opportunities.
6. Peer2Peer dining is an interesting trend that has emerged overseas which might not be a bad idea if implemented correctly.
7. You’ve got to be mobile. With wearable technological devices increasing, there is no turning back on this anymore. Hotel groups like Marriot, Hyatt and Hilton are currently working with companies like Checkmate to develop this mobile service even further, which means mobile is now a necessity in the hospitality industry.
8. According to a poll done for the Hotels.com mobile app, tourists upload holiday photos within ten minutes of arriving at a destination. Ignite Hospitality refers to them as “Braggies” and let’s face it, the “selfie” is here to stay. Keep in mind that people will be taking selfies at your destination too and they would want to link and share it with you. Be sure to be on social media!
9. Social Wi-Fi will be a trend in 2015, moving away from the original Wi-Fi login process, customers will now rather be encouraged to log onto destinations’ Wi-Fi through their social networks, allowing the destination to gain more access to the customer to build a better and stronger database.
10. Social reviews (Facebook, TripAdvisor, etc.) will only be increasing in 2015. Be sure that you have processes in place regarding responses to bad comments, maximizing good reviews, etc.
11. Stay active on social networks. Being on social networks is good, but you’ve got to interact and show customers that you are available on a daily basis.
12. Create your own mobile apps, allowing guests to order before they arrive. People tend to be impatient – ordering before they arrive will prevent them from waiting for their food, but it will also protect you from them changing their minds and going elsewhere when they arrive.
13. Food trends predicted for 2015 include reduced sugar and protein boosters. Customers want a “well-being feeling” and we need to cater for that.
14. Customers are experimenting with many local breweries and prefer beers and wines from micro-breweries and smaller boutique wineries. Guests would rather drink a beer that is promoted with the line: “We recommend this local beer, produced at a brewery just down the road.”
15. Sustainability is one of the big trends, whether we like it or not. Many customers prefer supporting establishments that make an effort to make their business more environmentally friendly. Consider looking at a few ways in which you can incorporate environmental and social responsibility in your business.

Top Hospitality Observations in 2014

In 2014 I’ve seen small garden café’s and large hotel groups. I’ve seen professional and less professional hospitality staff and I’ve been in the back office of many a destination. Here are my top 10 observations from 2014 – take it, use it and take 2015 by storm with new angles, new excitement and new plans:

Consistency is king ©RenatedeVilliers

Consistency is king ©RenatedeVilliers

  1. Why would a hotel room be perfect if housekeeping’s offices behind the scenes are unorganized? Like in life, beauty comes from the inside.  Start there.
  2. Consistency is king. When a guest is served a biscuit with his coffee today and not tomorrow, he will be disappointed. Don’t set a standard you can’t keep up with.
  3. Too few restaurants see the importance in gluten free and other healthier alternatives on their menus. If you ask me, a whole menu section dedicated to that might put you at the top of the list for many customers.
  4. Waitrons need additional communication skills and self-confidence. It seems that many waitrons would rather say nothing and only check their tables once, in order to protect themselves from difficult customers. It’s true that customers are difficult, but a waiter with self-confidence has less trouble than those who serve with fear.
  5. Branding still triggers the memory. Many establishments don’t use branded coasters, swizzle sticks, plates and other tangible items, probably mainly due to cost. Still, seeing the branding image at the entrance of a destination, again at reception, in the room or at the restaurant table and on the bill burns the memory into the customer’s brain. It’s one of the first things he will recall when someone asks for a referral to a restaurant or destination.
  6. Loyalty makes the destination. I’m not talking about customers’ loyalty. I’m talking about employees working for the destination’s loyalty. If staff don’t have the same reason for serving customers than what the destination promises, they might do more damage than good.
  7. First impressions really do last forever. If a guest is not greeted on arrival, not assisted with his luggage or not made feel welcome by a great atmosphere with audible background music, he might just not want to return.
  8. Small things have big impacts. Noticing your regular guests’ preferences and acting on it before they need to request it, makes a big impression. A fresh flower on the bed, bath salt in the bathroom, the guest’s favourite chocolate or hot chocolate on a cold winters’ night – those things make them feel at home.
  9. It’s a human thing. Guests don’t want to feel like numbers. They want to feel like friends. Being able to meet the chef or the general manager, exchanging a few short sentences and getting to know the people who play an integral role at the place they dine and stay, make guests feel important.
  10. At the end of the day, experience is all that matters. The thing with experience is that everything is interlinked: service standards, tastes, textures, ambiance, conversation, views, smells, sounds… That’s why every employee in the company needs to understand the whole restaurant / hotel wheel to see where they fit in and to ensure that they are able to meet those standards.